LOWELL AMATEUR RESEARCH INITIATIVE

Welcome to the Lowell Amateur Research Initiative (LARI) home page. The LARI program hopes to engage the ever-growing and technically sophisticated amateur astronomy community in some exciting research projects with Lowell astronomers.

A passionate researcher, Percival Lowell always sought to communicate new ideas and the joy of astronomy research to the public. In that same spirit, LARI brings together professional and amateur astronomers in a way that affords interested amateurs an opportunity to participate in cutting-edge research and potentially make significant contributions to science. Amateurs can help Lowell astronomers in their work and help create dedicated research teams. LARI will expand Lowell Observatory's education and public outreach missions, and promote greater awareness of astronomy and related sciences.

Currently, Lowell astronomers are conducting several projects that would benefit from the participation of amateur astronomers. These projects span a broad range of technical skills and knowledge from taking very deep images of galaxies to monitoring small stars for transient events to data mining. After getting a sense of your skills and interests, we will do our best to match you with the appropriate researcher and project.

And now, get started by perusing our amateur research options. When you find the ones that interest you, create your LARI account, tell us about yourself and what you would like to do. Soon, we hope to see you actively participating in research with a Lowell astronomer.

For more information, please contact LARI Manager Samantha Thompson at sthompson@lowell.edu or 928.233.3233

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NGC 2366

Steve Leshin, an amateur astronomer from Arizona, obtained this remarkable image of NGC 2366 using stacked images taken through R, G, B, and Ha filters. Total exposure time is 32.5 hours. This galaxy is one of those selected by Lowell's Dr. Deidre Hunter for the LITTLE THINGS research program. (Used with permission.)

   DCT Telescope Rendering

Lowell's new 4.2m DCT telescope