Winter Trips to Lowell Observatory

Get the most out of your seasonal visit.

Imagine a Place Like Snow Other

Did you know that Flagstaff, Arizona is one of the snowiest cities in the US?

It’s true! Located at an elevation of 7,000 feet, our cozy mountain town receives an average of 100 inches of snowfall each year. If you dream of postcard-perfect winter getaways complete with snowball fights, sledding, hot chocolate, and more, Flagstaff is the perfect destination.

Those looking to add an astronomical element to their winter itinerary should look no further than the top of Mars Hill. Though snowfall and freezing temperatures can sometimes inhibit stargazing and telescope viewing, there’s no shortage of winter activities at Lowell Observatory!

Keep this page on your radar for the latest on enjoying your visit to Lowell Observatory during the winter season.

 

 

Winter Constellations

Orion

The Hunter

Orion is the most visible and distinguishable constellation in the winter night sky. It is recognizable by three bright stars (Mintaka, Alnilam and Alnitak) which form a straight line known as Orion’s Belt. The Belt is so visible that it serves as a landmark in the sky to spot other constellations.

Canis Major

The Dog

Canis Major is visible in the southern sky during winter months for observers in the northern hemisphere. It’s possible to find Canis Major without any reference points, as Sirius, the brightest star in the sky, is part of this constellation.

Gemini

The Twins

Gemini is found to the northwest of Orion, with Taurus to its northeast. Castor and Pollux are the two brightest stars in the Taurus constellation, and are perfectly discernible to the unaided eye during the winter months.

Taurus

The Bull

The best way to find Taurus in the winter night sky is to follow the line formed by Orion’s Belt. On the east, Orion’s Belt points to Sirius, the brightest star in the sky. On the other side, it points to Aldebaran, the brightest star found in the Taurus constellation.

Perseus

The Hero

Perseus, named after the Greek mythological hero, lies in the northern sky, next to Andromeda. It’s actually one of the larger northern constellations, and also gives name to the Perseus family of constellations, which includes Andromeda, Auriga, Cassiopeia, Cepheus, Cetus, Lacerta, Pegasus, and Triangulum.

Cetus

The Sea Monster

Cetus is located in the northern sky, next to Eridanus, Aquarius and Pisces. Also known as the Whale, it is the fourth largest constellation in the sky. The constellation was named after Cetus, the sea monster from the Greek myth that tells the story of Andromeda.

Local Destinations

Looking for more activities to do while you’re in town? Check out Discover Flagstaff’s Winter Adventure page!

 

 

Discover Flagstaff

Upcoming Events at Lowell

On-Site Event

December 7 @ 4:35 pm

Moonrise Program

On-Site Event

December 8 @ 5:15 pm

Moonrise Program

On-Site Event

December 10 @ 7:00 pm

Meet An Astronomer

Virtual Event

December 15 @ 10:00 pm

Interactive Stargazing | It's Stargazing, Reimagined! December 15, 2022

On-Site Event

December 17 @ 7:00 pm

Meet An Astronomer

On-Site Event

December 24 @ 7:00 pm

Meet An Astronomer

On-Site Event

December 31 @ 7:00 pm

Meet An Astronomer

On-Site Event

01/07/2023 @ 7:00 pm

Meet An Astronomer

On-Site Event

01/14/2023 @ 7:00 pm

Meet An Astronomer

On-Site Event

01/21/2023 @ 7:00 pm

Meet An Astronomer

On-Site Event

01/28/2023 @ 7:00 pm

Meet An Astronomer

On-Site Event

02/04/2023 @ 7:00 pm

Meet An Astronomer

Local Winter Events